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viking university day

Viking University Day

Saturday, May 18, 2019 - 10:00am to 4:00pm
Don't miss an amazing opportunity to learn more about Viking-age society, history, food and culture from some of the world’s foremost Viking experts as well as local Scandinavian scholars from the University of Minnesota.
 
The Vikings Begin exhibition is on its first tour outside of Scandinavia and was produced by Sweden’s Uppsala University and its Gustavianum museum. It represents the culmination of more than 10 years of research and archaeology by prestigious University experts Neil Price, Charlotte Hedenstierna-Jonson and John Ljungkvist, which has led to deeper understandings about Viking culture and laid the groundwork for one of the finest Viking exhibitions ever to visit the United States. The Vikings were more than violent warriors. Find out more about the truths and the myths during this one-day university.
 
Sign up for individual sessions or all three and save $10. Click on the links to register.

Full Day Registration

Includes all sessions plus lunch, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. – $120

Individual Session Registration

Morning Session, 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. – $50

10:00 am – Neil Price, The Salme Ships: Two Newly-Discovered Boat Burials from the Early Viking Age on Saaremaa, Estonia

11:00 am – Lena Norrman, Power of Women in the Viking Age, Fiction or Fact

Lunch Session, 12:30 – 1:30 pm – $30 (includes meal)

12:30 pm – Mia-Louise Sellerup, Bringing Viking Food to the Modern Table – Aspects of authenticity in the world of Viking Age Cooking

*Special Q&A with Star Tribune Food Editor, Lee Dean, to follow

Afternoon Session, 2 – 4 p.m. – $50

2:00 pm – Gísli Sigurðsson, Vinland – as depicted in stories back home in Iceland

3:00 pm – Anatoly Liberman, The Devious History of the Scandinavian Languages: Before and After the Vikings

Our presenters:

The Salme Ships: Two Newly-Discovered Boat Burials from the Early Viking Age on Saaremaa, Estonia
Two remarkable boat burials, serving as graves for 40 men, were found on an Estonian island during roadwork at Salme. The boats and crews seem to have originated in central Sweden and apparently predate the standard 793 A.D. beginning of the Viking Age by a half century or more.
 
Lena Norrman, Professor of Scandinavian Studies, University of Minnesota
Power of Women in the Viking Age, Fiction or Fact
Power of Women in the Viking Age is not a myth. Findings show us that women were more active than one could have imagined. They were travelers between continents, warriors and carriers of weapons, and visually told their stories for others to see.
 
Mia-Louise Sellerup, Viking Food Expert, Ribe VikingeCenter, Denmark
Bringing Viking Food to the Modern Table – Aspects of authenticity in the world of Viking Age Cooking
The talk revolves around the complex and much debated field of Viking Age cookery. How can we as modern mediators of history understand the social structures linked to food and dining in a long-lost age? How do we communicate Viking Age cookery to museum visitors from around the world? 

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Mia-Louise Sellerup, Denmark’s Ribe Viking Center
Mia-Louise Sellerup, Denmark’s Ribe Viking Center
 
Vinland – as depicted in stories back home in Iceland
The Icelandic discovery of Greenland and later exploration of Vinland (now better known as the Canadian Maritimes and New England) around the year 1000 A.D. – as described in the Vinland sagas which were written in Iceland in the 13th century and reflect the oral memory of much earlier voyages to the fruitful lands south and west of Greenland. 
 
Anatoly Liberman, Professor of Scandinavian Studies, University of Minnesota
The Devious History of the Scandinavian Languages: Before and After the Vikings
No other post-Classical European language was recorded as early as Old Norse. It was a curious language: though some people could write it, no one could read it. Radically rejuvenated, this language burst into bloom very late, but in some places it has remained partly unchanged. The offspring of Old Norse are the modern Scandinavian languages. They are doing well, all things considered, except that once again Icelandic is fighting for its survival; that the pronunciation of Faroese has nothing to do with its spelling; that in some respects Swedish made itself more conservative than one could expect and in others gave up its most precious archaism; that Norwegian split into two languages; that spoken Danish is notoriously hard to understand; and that all three continental languages are split into numerous mutually unintelligible dialects--a motley but attractive picture.
 

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Supporters

The Vikings Begin exhibition is produced by the Gustavianum Museum, Uppsala University, and is presented by Viking® (vikingcruises.com). Lead support is provided by Svenska Sällskapet, Värde Partners, Vikings Museum (Minnesota Vikings) and Swedish Council of America. Major support is provided by the Barbro Osher Pro Suecia Foundation, Karin Larson, Ron and Carla Monson in honor of the Växjö Vikings, Charles and Myrna Smith, and ASI’s members and donors. ASI’s hotel partner is the Renaissance Minneapolis Hotel, The Depot. The exhibition’s media partner is the Star Tribune.

Minnesota artist activity is made possible by voters of Minnesota through a Minnesota State Arts Board Operating Support grant, thanks to a legislative appropriation from the arts and cultural heritage fund, and a grant from the Wells Fargo Foundation Minnesota.